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Cassava Web Innovations

Cassava Web Innovations

The on-going cassava industrialization in Nigeria and Ghana represents an expanding value chain that has the potential to transit into a value web and therefore provides an opportunity for assessing the potential impacts of biomass-based value webs on smallholders in Africa. WP 5.3 will evaluate staple crops, including cassava, in guinea savannah zones of Nigeria for potentials to transform from value chains to value web systems and will develop postharvest loss prevention strategies to strengthen emerging value webs.

Problem statement:

Cassava is a global candidate for food, feed, and energy (bio-ethanol) production. Due to the role of cassava in household food security, there is a policy dilemma in Africa: whether to promote the crop as a food security crop or tap its huge potential for industrial applications. The use of cassava for industrial applications could face implementation challenge without a credible evidence of the food security and income benefits to the poor. The on-going cassava industrialization in Nigeria and Ghana represents an expanding value chain that has the potential to transit into a value web and therefore provides an opportunity for assessing the potential impacts of biomass-based value webs on smallholders in Africa.

Objectives:

  • Evaluate staple crops, including cassava, in guinea savannah zones of Nigeria and Ghana for potentials to transform from value chains to value web systems.
  • Develop postharvest loss prevention strategies to strengthen emerging value webs.
  • Develop approaches for assessing the potential impact of biomass web strategies that intensify the production and processing of African crops into food, feed, energy (bio-ethanol, heat) or other industrial raw materials.

Research questions:

  • Is there potential for staple crops (e.g. cassava) in guinea savannah zones of Nigeria and Ghana to transform from value chains to value web systems?
  • Are the existing postharvest loss prevention strategies capable of strengthening emerging value webs in Nigeria and Ghana?
  • What are the potential impacts of value web development on the poor?

Methodology:

Using cassava as a test-crop, we will carry out analysis of the implications of biomass web improvement on the income and food security of rural populations, and ecological integrity of the guinea savannah areas of Nigeria and Ghana. The studies will focus on the following:

  • Evaluate staple crops, including cassava, in guinea savannah zones of Nigeria and Ghana for potentials to transform from value chains to value web systems.
  • Develop postharvest loss prevention strategies to strengthen emerging value webs.
  • Analysis of the potential impacts of biomass web strategies that intensify production and processing of cassava into foods and non-food products.

Countries of field research:

  • Nigeria
  • Ghana (Yet to be finalized)

Involved partners:

  • Dr. Adebayo Abass; IITA – Coordinating
  • Mathew K. Bolade; FUTA, Nigeria – Student training in Nigeria
  • Paul Amaza; University of Jos, Nigeria – Student training in Nigeria
  • Godwin Asumugha; NRCRI, Nigeria – Student training in Nigeria
  • Christopher Martius; ZEF – Student training in Germany
  • Joachim Müller; Univ. Hohenheim – Student training in Germany
  • Victor Okoruwa; UI, Nigeria – Student training in Nigeria
  • T. Shittu; FUUNAB, Nigeria – Student training in Nigeria
  • Bola Akinwande, Ladoke Akintola University, Nigeria – Student training in Nigeria

 

Investigators:

  • Dr. Adebayo Abass
    Senior Researcher
    International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
    Email: a.abass@cgiar.org
  • Mathew K. Bolade
    Senior Researcher
    Federal University of Technology Akure (FUTA)
  • Esther Eluagu-Ekeledo
    Junior Researcher
    International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA)
    University of Hohenheim

PhD and MSc students will conduct further research.

  • 2 PhD students (Food Science/Process Engineering) at the University of Bonn or University of Hohenheim (to be identified) and about five PhD or MSc students from Nigeria and if possible Ghana will conduct their research in the project.